April 21, 2019

Learnin in Christ’s School by Ralph Venning

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In Learning in Christ’s School, this unique account encourages growth in grace, ‘babes’, ‘little children’, ‘young men’ and ‘fathers’ are the stages through which the learners in Christ’s school pass on their way to the ‘academy of heaven’. While supporting and comforting beginners in the school of grace, Venning Encourages all Christians to make further progress towards ‘the measure of the stature of the fulness of Christ’ (Eph. 4:13).

284 Pages
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About the Author: Ralph Venning (1621-74) served as lecturer in St Olave’s Southwark until the Great Ejection in 1662. A outstanding preacher, he was the author of several books of which this is the best known.

All Things for Good by Thomas Watson

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Thomas Watson, the 17th-century minister of St. Stephen’s Walbrook, believed he faced two great difficulties in his pastoral ministry. The first was making the unbeliever sad, in the recognition of his need of God’s grace. The second was making the believer joyful in response to God’s grace. He believed the answer to the second difficulty could be found in Paul’s teaching in Romans 8:28 – God works all things together for good for his people; Thus his wonderful book All things For Good.

First published in 1663 (under the title A Divine Cordial), the year after Watson and some two thousand other ministers were ejected from the Church of England and exposed to hardship and suffering, All Things For Good contains the rich exposition of a man who lived when only faith in God’s Word could lead him to such confidence.

Thomas Watson’s exposition is always simple, illuminating and rich in practical application. He explains that both the best and the worst experiences work for the good of God’s people. He carefully analyses what it means to be someone who ‘loves God’ and is ‘called according to his purpose’. All Things For Good provides the biblical answer to the contemporary question; Why do bad things happen to good people?

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Exert From the Preface:
Christian Reader — There are two things which I have always looked upon as difficult. The one is, to make the wicked sad; the other is, to make the godly joyful. Dejection in the godly arises from a double spring; either because their inward comforts are darkened, or their outward comforts are disturbed. To cure both these troubles, I have put forth this ensuing piece, hoping, by the blessing of God, that it will buoy up their desponding hearts, and make them look with a more pleasant aspect. I would prescribe them to take, now and then, a little of this Cordial: ALL THINGS WORK TOGETHER FOR GOOD TO THEM THAT LOVE GOD. To know that nothing hurts the godly, is a matter of comfort; but to be assured that ALL things which fall out shall co-operate for their good, that their crosses shall be turned into blessings, that showers of affliction water the withering root of their grace and make it flourish more; this may fill their hearts with joy till they run over.

The Sinfulness of Sin by Ralph Venning

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We cannot understand the Christian gospel until we know what sin is. Yet modern secular counsellors urge us to ignore both the word and what it tells us about our rebellion against God and his law. Sadly, the church too often serves as an echo chamber for such cheap and short-sighted wisdom. It’s literature spreads the deceptive message that all is well. But it is only when we begin to see our sinfulness that we are able to discover god’s forgiveness.

Although The Sinfulness of Sin was written three hundred years ago, it remains an oasis of truth in a desert of lies. First published in the aftermath of the Great Plague of London and entitled Sin, The Plague of Plagues, this book gives a crystal-clear explanation of what sin is, why it is so serious, and what we need to do about it. Here is reliable medicine for a fatal epidemic.

284 Pages
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Ralph Venning

About the Author: Ralph Venning (1621-74) served as lecturer in St Olave’s Southwark until the Great Ejection in 1662. A outstanding preacher, he was the author of several books of which this is the best known.

Communion with God by John Owen

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John Owen believed that communion with God lies at the heart of the Christian life. With Paul he recognized that through the Son we have access by the Spirit to the Father. He never lost the sense of amazement expressed by John: ‘Our fellowship is with the Father and with his Son, Jesus Christ’. In “Communion with God” he explains the nature of this communion and describes the many privileges it brings.

Communion with God was written in a day, like our own, when the doctrine of the Trinity was under attack and the Christian faith was being reduced either to rationalism on the one hand or mysticism on the other. His exposition shows that nothing is more vital to spiritual well-being than a practical knowledge of what this doctrine means.

Until now, “Communion With God has been read by only small numbers of Christians with access to the 275 closely-printed pages in The Works of John Owen. Now Dr. R. J. K. Law has produced a splendidly readable abridgment of one of the greatest Christian classics of all time, bringing Owen’s rich teaching to a much wider readership.

Pages: 209
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About the Author: John Owen (1616-1638) was a leading Puritan pastor and theologian who served as a chaplain to Oliver Cromwell and later as Dean of Christ Church in the University of Oxford.

Apostasy from the Gospel by John Owen

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Few subjects have received less attention from contemporary Christian writers than that of apostasy. The idea that professing Christians may prove not to be true Christians is, in many respects, too serious a prospect for our facile age. But, for John Owen, such avoidance of the issue was itself a pressing reason for writing on it at length and in great depth of spiritual analysis. His exposition in his book Apostasy from the Gospel is a masterpiece of penetration and discernment.

Now, in this modernized abridgment of John Owen’s famous work, Dr R. J. K. Law makes its powerful teaching readily accessible to modern readers. Some will find its pages deeply soul-searching; others will be struck with the clarity of Owen’s insight; all will find a work which wounds in order to heal.

About the Author
John Owen (1616-1638) was a leading Puritan pastor and theologian who served as a chaplain to Oliver Cromwell and later as Dean of Christ Church in the University of Oxford.

166 Pages
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The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment by Jeremiah Burroughs

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Publisher’s Description: Publisher’s Review: Burroughs’ writings, some published before and others after his death, were numerous, but The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment is one of the most valuable of them all. Its author was much concerned to promote:

  1. peace among believers of various ‘persuasions’
  2. peace and contentment in the hearts of individual believers during what he describes as ‘sad and sinking times’.

The Rare Jewel concentrates upon this second aim. It is marked by sanity, clarity, aptness of illustration, and warmth of appeal to the heart. ‘There is an ark that you may come into, and no men in the world may live such comfortable, cheerful and contented lives as the saints of God’. Burroughs presses his lesson home with all the fervor and cogency of a true and faithful minister of God.

128 Pages
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A Sure Guide to Heaven by Joseph Alleine

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When the spiritual history of the Western world in the 20th century is written, it may well be seen as the epoch off spiritual sloth and slumber. Eternal realities seemed vaguely-defined and far-removed from daily life, and conformity to the world took the form of carelessness and neglect of spiritual issues. That is why it is no anachronism to republish a book from a day when men were more deeply conscious of the world to come, written by a servant of God whose preaching and writing were used to alarm and awaken many to the concerns of life and death, A Sure Guide to Heaven is such a book.

Such is the climate among Christians today that these pages may serve primarily as an instrument to revive believers before they become a tool for evangelism. It will not be the first time that Joseph Alleine has had that effect.

This book was previously published by the Trust under the title An Alarm to the Unconverted.

Today, Baxter’s principles, drawn from Scripture, and reapplied in terms of modern circumstances, will provide both ministers and other Christians with challenge, direction and help.

148 Pages
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Dying Thoughts by Richard Baxter

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Dying Thoughts is an exposition of Philippians 1:23 by one of the most outstanding pastors of the golden age of English Puritanism, dealing honestly with the doubts and fears that often assail a Christian facing the prospect of eternity, while also providing much needed counsel, strength and comfort. A devotional classic. More well known for his Reformed Pastor, Richard Baxter was the outstanding pastor of Kidderminster. Dying Thoughts is his exposition of Paul’s words in Philippians 1:23: ‘For I am in a strait betwixt two, having a desire to depart, and to be with Christ, which is far better.’ Benjamin Fawcett who made this abridged version of the original work wrote, ‘The ‘Dying Thoughts’ of Mr. Baxter chiefly present to our view what every Christian may attain, and what it is the highest interest, as well as the indispensable duty of every Christian to aspire after.’ In this little book, we see Baxter wrestling with his own doubts and fears as he faces eternity, jealously examining his own heart, anxious to test his own sincerity, taking nothing for granted. Baxter wanted to die with every grace in his soul in full vigour. A man of like passions as ourselves, his Dying Thoughts provides much needed counsel, strength and comfort because it deals with the same conflicts, complaints and desires which fill our own hearts.

124 Pages
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The Lord’s Supper by Thomas Watson

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To Thomas Watson, the Lord’s Supper was a visible sermon, a mirror in which to gaze on the sufferings and death of Christ. ‘God, to help our faith, does not only give us an audible Word, but a visible sign.’ But more than this, the Supper was a time in which to partake of the benefits of Christ’s death by faith, to be fed and cherished by the Lord in his own banqueting house, and to obtain a foretaste of the glory which will be fully realized only in heaven. Watson’s aim in writing his book ‘The Lord’s Supper‘ was to stimulate greater love to Christ in His people, and to enhance their appreciation of the Supper as a spiritual feast for all believers. His fine exposition shows the rich provision made in the Supper for all who love the Lord, while it also lays bare the emptiness of all mere sacramentalism.

86 Pages
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The Acceptable Sacrifice by John Bunyan

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What can man bring to God which will be excellent and acceptable in His sight? John Bunyan’s answer may surprise us in his book The Acceptable Sacrifice– a broken and contrite heart. This is the ‘acceptable sacrifice’ of the title.

This is a moving exposition of Psalm 51:17, “The sacrifices of God are a broken spirit: a broken and a contrite heart, O God, thou wilt not despise.” In this last work which he prepared for the press, Bunyan shows from Scripture why a broken heart is so acceptable to God. He characterizes the unbroken heart of man, showing why it must be made contrite, and explains the nature of the change which is involved. He also guides the reader in discerning whether this change has taken place, and shows how the heart, once broken, can be kept tender.

128 Pages
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