February 17, 2019

Come and Welcome to Jesus Christ by John Bunyan

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Of all John Bunyan’s writings, Come Welcome to Jesus Christ most fully expresses his delight and joy in the free and gracious welcome given to sinners by Jesus Christ.

It is a thorough exposition of John 6:37: All that the Father giveth me shall come to me; and him that cometh to me I will in no wise cast out. Bunyan not only explains the meaning of the terms used in the text, but also labours to remove the doubts and difficulties of sinners and backsliders in their approach to Christ.

This work could be said to have given rise indirectly to the modern missionary movement, since it strongly influenced Andrew Fuller, the first secretary of the pioneering Baptist Missionary Society, and helped him to set his denomination free from the grip of hyper-Calvinism. It is a Christian classic that deserves a wide modern readership.

240 Pages
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Christian Love by Hugh Binning

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In his Treatise of Christian Love, the Scottish Covenanting minister Hugh Binning movingly presents the need for Christians to show by their love for one another that they belong to Christ. Basing his remarks on John 13:35, By this shall all men know that ye are my disciples, if ye have love one to another, he argues, ‘This is the badge that Christ left to his disciples: if we cast this away on every disagreement, we disown our Master, and disclaim his token and badge.’ Hugh Binning (1627-53) describes the excellence of Christian love, demonstrating its nature from 1 Corinthians 13. He gives strong reasons why Christians should love one another, and shows that love is rooted in Christian humility and meekness, after the pattern of Christ Himself. Also included in this edition are three sermons from Binning’s work The Sinner’s Sanctuary, an exposition of Romans 8:1-15.

106 Pages
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Jerusalem Sinner Saved or, Good News for the Vilest of Men by John Bunyan

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John Bunyan confessed himself to have been one of the worst sinners to have ever walked God’s earth. After his conversion to Jesus Christ, he was constantly amazed by the fact that the God of infinite grace should have saved him from his sin. As a minister of the gospel, he loved to proclaim the grace of God to sinners and earnestly persuaded his hearers to embrace by faith the Lord Jesus Christ in whom is found the free pardon of all our sins.

The Jerusalem Sinner Saved, Published by Bunyan in the year of his death (1688), brings together the fruit of his thinking on the grace of forgiveness. With the warmth and fervency of spirit of a true evangelist, he beautifully unfolds the riches of God’s grace and mercy to the greatest of sinners. Here, as the subtitle of the book says, is ‘Good News for the Vilest of Men’!

‘I have been vile myself, but have obtained mercy; and I would have my companions in sin partake of mercy too: and, therefore, I have writ this little book.’ John Bunyan

Pages: 144
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Josiah’s Reformation by Richard Sibbes

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Richard Sibbes always sought to get under the superficial layer of his listeners’ behavior and deal with their hearts. He knew that the outward acts of sin spring from the inner desires of the heart. Merely to alter a person’s behavior without dealing with those desires would cultivate hypocrisy, the self-righteous cloak for a cold and vicious heart. Sibbes believed that hearts must be turned, and evil desires eclipsed by stronger ones for Christ.

Josiah’s Reformationis as relevant today as when it was first published in 1629. Our busyness and activism so easily degenerate into a hypocrisy in which we keep up all the appearance of holiness without the heart of it. Christians even use Christ as a package to pass on to others, instead of enjoying him first and foremost as their own Saviour. But true reformation must begin in the heart, with love for Christ. And that can only come when the free grace of God in Christ Jesus is preached.

Reading Sibbes is like sitting in the sunshine: he gets into your heart and warms it to Christ. – MICHAEL REEVES

Pages: 176
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